Previous events

Jack Charles v The Crown

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Q Rangatira, 305 Queen St, Auckland

From Stolen Generation to Koori theatre in the 70s, from Hollywood film sets to Victoria’s state prisons, Jack Charles V The Crown runs the gamut of a life lived to its utmost. A gifted performer, Jack Charles has struggled with homelessness, drug addiction and jail time for much of his career. But this is no simple parable of crime and punishment. Charles’ charm, humour, talent and unswerving optimism transforms his life of hard knocks into an extraordinary tale.

Returning triumphantly to the stage, Charles is not afraid to confront the complexity of his story. In doing so he shines a light on Australia’s history of injustices against Aboriginal people. His vital reflections on race and the punitive state are uplifted by a sense of hope found within the redemptive qualities of storytelling.

Under the wing of ILBIJERRI, the oldest Indigenous theatre company in Australia, Charles’ journey moves lyrically between raw video footage, charismatic monologues, mock courtroom trials and even a pottery demonstration, all interspersed with rousing musical numbers backed by a three-piece band. Delighting audiences internationally, including at an acclaimed premiere season at London’s Barbican Theatre, Charles’ generous spirit and warm presence is set to win the hearts of Auckland audiences.

Jack Charles v The Crown

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Q Rangatira, 305 Queen St , Auckland

UNCLE JACK CHARLES IS AN AUSTRALIAN LEGEND: A VETERAN ACTOR, MUSICIAN, ABORIGINAL ELDER AND ACTIVIST, WHO PERFORMS THIS POWERFUL ONE-MAN SHOW ON THE COLOURFUL LIFE HE HAS LED ON STAGE AND SCREEN AND – MOST POIGNANTLY – BEHIND BARS.

Jack Charles v The Crown

 —  —

Q Rangatira, 305 Queen St, Auckland

From Stolen Generation to Koori theatre in the 70s, from Hollywood film sets to Victoria’s state prisons, Jack Charles V The Crown runs the gamut of a life lived to its utmost. A gifted performer, Jack Charles has struggled with homelessness, drug addiction and jail time for much of his career. But this is no simple parable of crime and punishment. Charles’ charm, humour, talent and unswerving optimism transforms his life of hard knocks into an extraordinary tale.

Returning triumphantly to the stage, Charles is not afraid to confront the complexity of his story. In doing so he shines a light on Australia’s history of injustices against Aboriginal people. His vital reflections on race and the punitive state are uplifted by a sense of hope found within the redemptive qualities of storytelling.

Under the wing of ILBIJERRI, the oldest Indigenous theatre company in Australia, Charles’ journey moves lyrically between raw video footage, charismatic monologues, mock courtroom trials and even a pottery demonstration, all interspersed with rousing musical numbers backed by a three-piece band. Delighting audiences internationally, including at an acclaimed premiere season at London’s Barbican Theatre, Charles’ generous spirit and warm presence is set to win the hearts of Auckland audiences.

Jack Charles v The Crown

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Fairfax Studio, St Kilda Rd, Melbourne

Following an internationally-acclaimed tour, Uncle Jack Charles returns to Australia to perform Jack Charles V The Crown as part of ILBIJERRI’s 25th anniversary.

An Australian legend, Uncle Jack Charles is a veteran actor, musician, Koori elder and activist, but for a good portion of his nearly 70 years he has also been an addict, a thief and a regular in Victoria’s prisons.

From Stolen Generation to Koori theatre in the 70s, from film sets to Her Majesty’s prisons, Jack Charles V The Crown runs the gamut of a life lived to its utmost. Charles’ unswerving optimism transforms this tale of addiction, crime and doing time into a kind of vagabond’s progress – a map of the traps of dispossession and a guide to reaching the age of grey-haired wisdom.

This fleet-footed, light-fingered one-man show is a theatrical delight and a celebration of Black Australia’s dogged refusal to give up on getting on.

Black Arm Band @ Svara Bhumi (Songs of the Earth)

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Dewan Sri Pinang, Jalan Tun Syed Sheh Barakbah, Penang

Svara Bhumi (Songs of the Earth) is the official opening show of GTF this year - a tribute to the land and indigenous music of the region. The concert is a unique attempt to connect the dots between lands and the stories of its people through ancient music that has passed on from generations.

One of Australia’s leading aboriginal bands, the Black Arm Band, comes with a musical presentation, forged from over 40,000 years of living with culture, and now infused with contemporary styles. They will be joined by New Zealander Ria Hall, who was featured in Stan Walker’s 2014 Aotearoa, a video to celebrate Maori Language Week. Also performing will be Indonesian singer Ayu Laksmi, who combines Eastern and Western influences along with spirituality in her compositions; and Malaysia’s Alena Murang, playing the sape - a traditional lute instrument. The concert will also feature the Mah Meri, one of eighteen “orang asli” groups found in Western Malaysia, whose ceremonial dance and music will provide a traditional opening for our show.

“The Black Arm Band reminds me of the long struggle and the long journey we’ve been on. Thirty years ago, we were marching for justice down the city streets, but now, we’re telling our stories in the concert halls.” - Archie Roach

BLACK ARM BAND - Barbican Centre - LONDON

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Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London

Indigenous music group Black Arm Band unveil the fascinating story of their heritage, language and homelands and a side to Australia seldom seen by the world, taking us on a journey of vast landscapes and diverse communities.

Musicians from all over Australia, from rainforests, deserts, coastal towns and inner cities, demonstrate the vibrancy of Indigenous cultures. Singing in eleven languages and featuring the words of author Alexis Wright (Carpentaria) they give a human voice to these stories, as visuals by Melbourne’s Daybreak Films provide an rare opportunity to observe the communities in their own settings. An evocative juxtaposition of music and images; birds soaring alongside rich vocal harmonies, dust clouds swirl as we hear deep hum of a digeridoo, and children play basketball to hip-hop beats.

‘This tells the story of my connection to jagun (country). How I am the country, how I am keeping the heartbeat of my country going.’ - Emma Donovan, singer and Gumbayngirr woman.

‘Profoundly beautiful’ – Theatreview

‘Rich, melodious and undeniably intoxicating’ – Adelaide InDaily

Complementing dirtsong, Barbican Theatre presents The Shadow King by Malthouse Theatre, which also explores themes of land rights and cultural heritage.

BLACK ARM BAND - Sao Paulo - BRAZIL

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SESC, Clelia Street, 93 - Barra Funda, Sao Paulo

O grupo australiano Black Arm Band tem com principal objetivo celebrar a cultura contemporânea aborígene. Seu espetáculo Dirtsong é composto por projeção de imagens e música, cantada em onze línguas aborígenes por artistas australianos consagrados. A companhia já se apresentou para mais de um milhão de pessoas em todo o mundo, realizando turnês por países como China, Cingapura, Taiwan, Canadá, Estados Unidos, Europa e Reino Unido, e se apresentará pela primeira vez na América do Sul durante o festival Australia Now. - See more at: http://www.institutopinheiro.org.br/eventos/black-arm-band/?localidade=sao-paulo&set_it=1#.Vv5gyWR94y5

Jan28

Jack Charles v The Crown

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The University Theatre, 230 University Court Northwest, University Way NW, Calgary

Part of the 30th annual High Performance Rodeo, Calgary’s International Festival of the Arts

Based on the life of Uncle Jack Charles, spoken in his own words.

A powerful one-man show that shines the spotlight on the colourful life of one of Australia’s near forgotten treasures. Jack is an actor, musician, potter and gifted performer, but for a good portion of his nearly 70 years he has also been homeless, an addict, a thief and a regular in Victoria’s prisons.

A respected Aboriginal elder who pioneered Koorie theatre in the early 70s, founded Nindethana, the first Aboriginal theatre company, was a television regular and the star of movies including The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, Jack is one of Australia’s most highly regarded performers. At almost 70, no longer caught in the cycle of addiction, crime and doing time, Jack sings and tells his extraordinary tale with extraordinary flair.

“Steeped in decades of our history (social, political, theatrical), surprisingly upbeat…

A warm-hearted, very entertaining evening.” - Sydney Morning Herald

“There is something special about Uncle Jack. Something about his voice, his stature, his laugh, his story – something powerful but humbling. It was that something that ricocheted people to their feet to give the man a standing ovation. It is most certainly, something that you won’t want to miss.” - Australian Stage

Jan21

Jack Charles v The Crown

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The Fei and Milton Wong Experimental Theatre , 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver

Jack Charles was a child of Australia’s Stolen Generation. Now in his 70s he is a celebrated actor, but also a drug addict with a mile-long rap sheet. In this remarkable work, he looks back at a life lived, and pleads his case.

ILBIJERRI Theatre Company (Australia), presented by PuSh Festival.

Jack Charles v The Crown

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National Arts Centre, 53 Elgin St, Ottawa

Aboriginal. Actor. Addict. Residential School Survivor. Cat Burglar. Homosexual. Jack Charles is an Australian tribal Elder and a living legend. This highly entertaining and autobiographical presentation, which includes a three-piece band, runs the gamut of a life lived to its utmost, spanning Charles’ career as an actor/musician, a lifetime of political activism, and a terrifying descent into heroin addiction and petty crime. His experience as a stolen child echoes the plight of Canada’s own Indigenous people – and his heart-warming presence, generous spirit and unswerving optimism make his journey one of resilience and reconnection. Jack Charles is a theatrical marvel. Jan 12th - 16th 2016

ILBIJERRI THEATRE and BLACK ARM BAND 2015 Western Arts Alliance Annual Conference

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The Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver

FilmHarmonix is extremely proud to be involved with two of Australia's leading Indigenous acts, Ilbijerri Theatre and Black Arm Band at the 2015 Western Arts Alliance Annual Conference in Vancouver this year. Preview performances of "Jack Charles v The Crown" by Ilbijerri and "dirtsong" by Black Arm Band will be presented for the international arts market.